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20121112
20121120
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
boehner. i'm not sure that i see it yet. the president said you have to go to the clinton area, 36% top marginal rate. and you said a few loopholes that's fine but not the real battle we should be undertaking. am i correct? >> now boehner we're back to% where we were before the election in some respects. there is a significant core of the republican party that simply will not raise taxes under any sixths. they will not raise rates. they still feel that they are pledged to grover norquist, maybe not to the american people. not to the constitution, but to grover norquist. therefore they're not going to go along--even if boehner wants them to go along. both sides the president and democrats on one side, boehner and the republicans are basically maneuvering for bargaining position for what is going to be a long-term negotiation. >> eliot: they're just shadow boxing, i think that's exactly right. i wonder and i'm trying to assess--i have no knowledge of what goes on inside the republican party but i'm trying to discern if boehner has more strength now than he did when this negotiation took p
they already agreed to that. i think you heard john boehner say that already. we've had votes in the senate where we've actually gotten rid of tax credits. i think that's a given. and i think the vast majority of americans agree with that. the question is how do you do that and how do you allow taxes to rise at the same time you fix the real problem? and the real problem is uncontrolled entitlement spending and a government that has grown massively. not just under this administration, under republican administration. >> let me turn to senator schumer on this point. >> so you have to approach both sides of it. >> let me turn to senator schumer. i'm going to ask you the same question. if the mandate is compromised, what do democrats have to be prepared to accept as a painful outcome in order to achieve compromise? >> well, i agree with you, the mandate is compromise. that's why we have a divided house and senate. and i think if the house stands for anything it's cut government spending, as tom coburn said, and i think we're going to have to do more of it. we heard the mandate in 2010, where i
an optimistic note about the way forward, as did speaker boehner after the meeting. >> my hope is that this is going to be the beginning of a fruitful process where we're able to come to an agreement that will reduce our deficit in a balanced way. >> to show our seriousness, we have put revenue on the table as long as it's accompanied by significant spending cuts. >> nbc's mike viqueira joins us live from the white house. mike, are there any signs, i have to put this to you, that the president may be able to persuade republicans at least to maintain the bush tax cuts on those making less than $250,000 a year? is there any sign that he's going to be able to persuade them on that? >> reporter: well, i think that he would be able to persuade them to extend those tax cuts, but he may not be able to persuade them to decouple them from those making more than $250,000 a year, martin. i don't mean to be flip, but that does remain at the end of the day here after the big root velt room photo-op the main sticking point. it's clear democrats feel they have the upper hand as do democrats h
skaur enough votes to implement an austerity budget so now he's back to help john boehner secure enough votes versus the president to press for an austerity budget, is that right? >> yeah, that's correct, martin. it's interesting, there's a lot of criticism saying paul ryan's vision for an american budget was routinely rejected flat out by voters a little more than a week ago. so why will he have such an impact in terms of the fiscal cliff negotiations? and the reason is that paul ryan, despite the presidential loss, continues to be the ideological godfather of the current republican budget -- >> but, luke, he just got ripped to shreds. he just got pulverized in the election. in fact, so many of his ideas, he had to go quiet on because they were so deficient and attacked during the presidential campaign. yet there you are now telling our audience he's back and republicans have him as their -- one of their main stakeholders. >> he's very much still an important player within the house republican conference. so much so that speaker boehner when it came to having a daily meeting about the
anything that speaker boehner said make you optimistic? was it just that urgency that you're talking about? >> well, it's the urgency, but i think the spirit at the table was one of everybody wants to make the best effort to get this done. hopefully that is possible. hopefully it is possible by the middle of december so the confidence of the markets and, most importantly, the confidence of the consumers returns to infuse our economy with demand, which creates jobs. >> you said afterwards there would be these milestones of success. how will that work? what are the goals? are there interim goals? >> well, my suggestion was that we at some point, not necessarily today, decide on what our goal is in terms of the amount of deficit reduction that we can achieve, some date by which we'd like to do it, the middle of december so this doesn't take us up to christmas, some milestones along the way so progress can be demonstrated we're moving in a forward direction. >> i spoke to senator michael bennet of colorado earlier this week. he said this really comes down to speaker boehner and president obama
uncertainty despite the president's comments and john boehner's comments. cheryl: we're looking at what we've been seeing over the last couple of months and you are saying kind of be prepared for that. a lot of the guests have come on and said you know, there's problems with earnings, but also you can't ignore that spike to the down side after the election. what did you make of all of that last week? what did you read into that? >> well, i mean, heading into the election, there was a lot of sentiment that the the market, the financial markets would have preferred a republican winner. cheryl: sure. fiscally more responsible if their view. -- in their view. >> correct. there's a few there's a lot of financial regulation presently and more to come. a lot of that at least from professional investors is probably where they were on wednesday. cheryl: they were waiting to see. >> i think that's going to settle off. i don't think you will see 300 point swings. you might see back again -- i'm quoting that period of july and august 2011, you could see 100, 150 on any given day, maybe a little bit ou
the president had with house speaker boehner a year ago in the summer that you talked about putting social security and medicare on the table but this is a different tile. he's got an election behind him. he's got a majority now looking for a very different course. all of the polls show the overwhelming majority of americans, includion republicans do not want social security and medicare cut in order to deal with deficits, and so i think the president's got the high ground. i think he's going to see a mobilization of his own base, the entire base of the democratic party mobilize to say don't touch medicaid, don't touch medicare and social security, raise taxes on the rich, and protect the vulnerable, and he's going to face a lot of his own people if he goes a different way. >> so, let's talk about taxes for a second. i don't know why we're having a discussion with republicans on attaches either. if we let the tax cuts expire and reinstitute the middle class tax cuts, which would be a guarantee, because every politician agrees, we would get $1 trillion. in the so-called grand bargain presid
boehner immediately saying he generally supportive of trying to close the loop holes. do you see that as raising taxes? >> what boehner said and in the republican position since republican we should reduce rates have economic growth many of which are put in by obama for the solyndra green-type energy programs. let's bring the rates down. boehner was clear he wanted increase revenues it is not a tax increase to put more americans at work. if our recovery was growing the rate reagans did more americans would be at work. in terms of raising revenue which boehner grew about. if you grew the economy at reagan levels instead of two percent and obama and french levels, just growing faster and do that for a decade, the federal government gets trillions in taxes. we could undo the damage by having higher growth. >> gretchen: that's the difference in ideology. raise it to 3#.9 percent x. replace the alternative minimum tax with the buffet and raise the state tax and long-term capitol gains from 15-20. where do you think that those four points will go in negotiations with the republicans? >
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)